Photo by Adriene Biondo

Driftwood Dairy

The Driftwood Dairy is an El Monte institution, founded by Mike Dolan in 1946 to continue his family’s long dairy legacy. It started as a single store and a home delivery route, and eventually expanded into a national corporation that keeps its roots in El Monte. One of the few surviving remnants of the company’s earlier years is the Driftwood Dairy drive-thru (originally known as the Driftyland Dairy-Port) on Lower Azuza Road. This is a truly spectacular example of Googie design, built by Theodore Masterson (who may have also designed it) in 1961.

The Los Angeles Times touted it as “one of the most modern dairy drive-ins in the world,” and indeed it was, with a massive parabolic arch canopy sheltering its small retail structures.

A huge pole sign stands outside the canopy, advertising its dairy products on hexagonal signs topped by a giant spike. The outer curbs of the business’ driveway are decorated with custom-made ceramic tiles featuring a milk bottle and the friendly face of “Drifty,” the company’s bovine mascot. The Driftwood Dairy recently survived a demolition threat—a good thing, too, as it is a very rare example of an intact drive-thru dairy. It illustrates the surging influence of the car on designs during the postwar period, as well as mid-century Googie roadside architecture at its very best.

Don Lee Mutual Broadcast Building
Photo by Devri Richmond

Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study

Architecturally self-assured, unmistakably modern, and undeniably Hollywood, upon its completion in 1948 the former Don Lee Mutual Broadcast Building was the then-largest studio built for simultaneous television and radio transmission.
La Villa Basque
Photo by Larry Underhill

La Villa Basque

A unique landmark in the industrial city of Vernon for over half a century, its unique hybrid of coffee shop, lounge, fine dining establishment, and event space served everyone from truck drivers to wedding parties.